Tag Archives: frequent traveler

Tip: Pick A Reliable Aircraft For On-Time Flights

reliable-aircraft-on-time-flights

When people book flights, their decision is typically based on price and/or schedule. But a recent study found there may be another factor to consider if you want your travel day to run smoothly.  Turns out, paying attention to the type of aircraft you will be flying on may save you from delays or cancellations.  Some aircraft models are known to need repairs more often than others. Additionally, what may be a reliable aircraft for one airline, may be the worst option of another airline. This is due to different internal repair processes between different airlines. Of course, not all flight schedules include the type of aircraft. Some busier routes offer a variety of different flights and options. Travelers on these frequent routes can often see the type of aircraft when booking reservations. 

Tips to choosing a reliable aircraft

  • Boeing 737s are the top in reliability for most airlines. In this study, United 737s out performed United 757s in less delays or cancellations. United 737s arrived on time 82% compared to United 757s at only 70% on time.
  • Most airlines are phasing out Boeing 747s by the end of this year, in an effort to improve overall reliability.
  • Regional jets have a higher rate of delays and cancellations compared to larger jets. These smaller jets are often the first to be delayed or cancelled, allowing more customers to fly on the larger jets.
  • Discount airlines often have weaker reliability than larger carriers. Fewer planes and busy schedules often mean there are less spare airplanes to replace an airplane needing repair. This leads to cancellations or long delays.
  • Planes with fancy lie-down seats often have more frequent delays and cancellations. These seats come with complicated parts that take additional time to repair if they break. Luckily, these flights are typically just delayed, as the airlines cater to these top-dollar customers.
  • Delta’s best performing aircraft is their MD-88 jets, though they are on average 26 years old. They have a cancellation rate of only 0.6% and an on-time arrival rate of 82.8%. This is an example of differences between airlines. Though the MD-88s work best for Delta, they are one of the worst performers for American Airlines. It has a cancellation rate four times higher than Delta, and arrived on time to only 69.1% of their flights.
  • Use the chart in the image above the article to find the most reliable aircraft by airline, from best to worst.

If you are a frequent business traveler, delays or cancellations can really screw with your itinerary. Try choosing your next flight based on a reliable aircraft. Let us know if the tip helped your travels by commenting on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

Don’t Check Your Manners with Your Luggage: 3 Major Annoyances for Business Travelers

business traveler annoyances Many surveys have been conducted on what really annoys travelers, and whether it’s a frequent business traveler, the occasional vacationer, or a family with kids in tow, the major annoyances seem to be the same. Here are three of the worst, and while they seem to be common sense for most of us, they’re apparently not, since they top almost every list.

  1. Traveling while sick: Who wants to sit next to someone who is coughing and sneezing on a 3-hour flight? After all, you are going to breath the same circulated air at some time during the flight.
  2. Seat etiquette (or lack thereof): I think we’ve all had an experience with the obnoxious seat tapper–those people who sit behind you listening to their music and tapping to the beat. There’s also the space invader–those who feel they need to lean their seat back during the entire flight, knocking your laptop screen down, or just being in the way when someone needs to get out of your row. And of course there’s the seat grabber–those people who grab on to the top of your seat on the way to and from the restroom. (I personally don’t mind people using the seat back for support in situations like this, but keep in mind, I may have to use it for a flotation devise so try to keep it in one piece.) And last but not least, there’s the eternal talker. The minute you sit down you’re greeted with a barrage of twenty-one questions. What do you do for a living? Where are you from? Where are you headed? Do you want your peanuts? Don’t get me wrong, I’m OK with friendly talk, but some people never stop! This is when I usually pretend to fall asleep.
  3. Violating the overhead bin rule: With the introduction of checked bag fees there has been a dramatic increase in on-flight carry-on luggage. Most airlines are really trying to help. They are adding extended bins, larger bins, and will often check your carry-on at the gate, usually at no cost. But have you seen what some people call a carry-on? They try to pass a huge suitcase off as their small roller board. Then they have trouble lifting it into the overhead bin. It takes two body builders and a can of axle grease before the bin door can be closed!

While these are just a few of the major complaints of travelers, I’m sure we each have our own we can add to the list. And for most of us, the rule of the road (or the plane) for dealing with them is to simply bite our tongues and think to ourselves, “This too shall pass.”